The Lead Feed

In this article, we delve into the Career and Technical Education programs offered through North Carolina’s community colleges, examining employment and wage outcomes by program area and age.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased 0.1 of a percentage point to 4.1 percent from April’s revised rate of 4.0 percent.

Every year lists detailing the best jobs in America are released by groups such as Glassdoor, Indeed and U.S. News and World Report.  These lists have similar methodologies which include some combination of open opportunities – are people being hired to do the job – and salaries – the higher the better.  These lists rate occupations from a national perspective, but the question I have is whether the best occupational opportunities in North Carolina mirror the best jobs in the nation.  

The 2019 Star Jobs for Local Areas are out for you to consider for good career options.  We’ve included some observations of these jobs.

Last month, we released our 2017-2026 Sub-State Long Term Industry Projections for North Carolina.

In April, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates decreased in all of North Carolina's 100 counties.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate remained unchanged from March’s revised rate of 4.0 percent.

Every two years, in conjunction with the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), the North Carolina Department of Commerce publishes long-term industry and occupation employment projections. Projections data provide information for policy makers, job seekers, training providers, and businesses to make informed workforce decisions, and help ensure that North Carolina’s workforce is prepared for tomorrow’s job opportunities and economic growth in the state. This article summarizes information on projected employment change for the 2017-2026 period and provides key findings by major occupational groups for sixteen prosperity sub-zones. 

In March, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates decreased in 81 of North Carolina's 100 counties.

North Carolina’s labor market continues to tighten, with rapid growth in job openings but a dwindling supply of jobseekers. This article uses recently updated data from LEAD’s Labor Supply/Demand Analyzer to highlight some of the most noteworthy labor market trends of 2018.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased 0.1 of a percentage point to 4.0 percent from February’s revised rate of 3.9 percent.

In February, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates decreased in 99 of North Carolina's 100 counties.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased 0.1 of a percentage point to 3.9 percent from January’s revised rate of 3.8 percent.

In January, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates increased in all of North Carolina's 100 counties.

In this article we examine whether graduating from college and earning a Bachelor’s degree yields better outcomes than enrolling in college but not graduating. We find that college graduates are more likely to find work and tend to earn higher wages than those who do not finish college.