The Lead Feed

While many sectors have steadily regained employment following the COVID-19 recession, the childcare service workforce continues to face a significant shortfall. In this article, we use data from the North Carolina Common Follow-up System (CFS) to show the shortfall in childcare service employment can be primarily attributed to increased worker outflows among younger childcare workers to other higher-paying industries or out of the workforce altogether.

In October, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates increased in 99 of North Carolina's 100 counties.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased from September’s revised rate of 3.6 percent.

NCcareers.org raises awareness of different careers for all North Carolinians by providing access to career information

In September, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates decreased in 99 of North Carolina's 100 counties.

Recent American Community Survey (ACS) data for 2021 provide insights into youth engagement in North Carolina over the past two years.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased from August’s revised rate of 3.5 percent.

A recent LEAD presentation to a Triad-area health care workforce group offers insights on economic trends in the health care industry.

Previous research has predicted that technological progress will cause widespread unemployment by replacing human laborers with machines, while other more recent analyses stress that automation may lead to disruptions for some occupations but finds widespread destruction of jobs unlikely. This analysis examines automation’s potential risk to North Carolina’s labor market, finding that automation will disrupt employment in some occupations but machines are unlikely to replace large segments of human labor.

Does timing matter for college graduates entering the workforce? Beginning a career during an economic downturn can have long-term wage implications for graduates in the form of “recession scarring.” We find evidence wage scarring effects disappear over time and appear minimal for the class of 2020 due to tight labor market conditions.

In August, not seasonally adjusted unemployment rates increased in 98 of North Carolina's 100 counties.

We all know how difficult it is to find restaurant workers these days. In this article, we use data from the North Carolina Common Follow-up System (CFS) to determine what happened to all those people who were working in North Carolina’s bars and restaurants prior to the COVID-19 pandemic and explain why it has been so hard to hire restaurant workers in recent years.

A previous blog used Job-to-Job Flows (J2J) Explorer data from the U.S. Census Bureau to understand job mobility in North Carolina. Continuing to use the J2J data, this blog confirms that for the most part, earnings and separations in North Carolina were inversely related. This has implications for training and hiring practices, especially in lower-wage industries.

We are excited to announce updated NC TOWER - a web-based delivery system that provides information on post-graduation wages, employment, and subsequent enrollment for students who attended public universities and community colleges in North Carolina.

North Carolina's seasonally adjusted unemployment rate increased from July’s revised rate of 3.4 percent.