NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center works in regions, counties, cities, towns, downtown districts, and in designated North Carolina Main Street communities, to inspire placemaking through building asset-based economic development strategies that achieve measurable results such as investment, business growth, and jobs.

Award and Champion Nominations

 

Award Nominations

For Designated Main Street and Small Town Main Street Communities ONLY

Overview:

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center is proud to present the annual NC Main Street Awards competition, recognizing the hard work, dedication and success of our NC Main Street communities and their achievements in the Four Points of the Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization: Economic Vitality, Design, Promotion, and Organization.

Entry Deadline:

September 30, 2022  | 5pm

Awards Ceremony:

March 15, 2023 | Statesville

Eligibility:

Any active NC Main Street community that met the statistics deadline for the most recent fiscal year

Projects must have been completed within the past two years of the submission date

Guidelines:

  • Each community may submit up to five nominations for downtown district projects
  • A project may be entered in only one category
  • The jury reserves the right to move an entry to a different category, if they feel there is a more appropriate fit
  • The jury reserves the right to withhold an award in any category or to designate more than one winner if they deem appropriate
  • Any previously nominated project that did not receive an award and still meets the two-year time limit may be resubmitted
  • All construction projects must meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation
  • All materials will become property of the NC Main Street and Rural Planning Center
  • Nominations must include the Main Street Director’s electronic signature. By signing the online submission, the Main Street Director acknowledges the submission is on behalf of their town/board of directors

Instructions:

Submissions will ONLY be accepted by the Local Main Street Directors/Local Small Town Main Street Coordinators.

 

Champion Nominations

For Designated Main Street Communities ONLY

Deadline

September 30, 2022 by 5pm

About the Designation

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center is proud to annually recognize the efforts of dedicated individuals who have contributed to the success of the local programs across our state. A non-competitive award, the NC Main Street Champion designation honors those persons who have made extraordinary contributions to their downtown. The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center will individually recognize Champions with a video presentation and commemorative certificates celebrating this special honor during the Annual NC Main Street Conference.

Who is Eligible to Nominate a Champion?

Only communities that are a designated NC Main Street community are eligible to nominate a Champion.
DAC and Small-Town Main Street communities may nominate once they move up to NC Main Street.

Why Nominate?

Designating an NC Main Street Champion is a wonderful way to show your organization’s appreciation for the efforts of a deserving person (or persons) who has/have gone the extra mile in working to make your downtown successful. A secondary benefit of designating a Champion is the opportunity it provides for generating goodwill and positive PR for your downtown program.

Nomination Categories

NC Main Street Champions MUST BE PEOPLE, who have made a SIGNIFICANT impact in a downtown or a downtown program, ideally over the last year and who went above and beyond their volunteer or job responsibilities. Once an NC Main Street Champion, always an NC Main Street Champion! If your program has previously honored someone as an NC Main Street Champion, that individual continues to be a Champion for your community and may not be re-designated by your program. However, someone who received the designation from another community and has made significant contributions to your downtown’s revitalization efforts may also be named a Champion by your town.

​Champion Designation May Fall Under The Following Categories:

  • An individual - (John Smith)
  • A couple - (John and Lucy Smith)
  • A civic organization board of directors - (Board of Directors, Smallville Arts Council)
  • Owners of a downtown business - (John Smith)
  • Owners of a property - (John Smith)
  • Governmental council - (Board of Commissioners, Town of Smallville)
  • Departmental staff (Public Works Staff, Town of Smallville)

Champion nominations ARE NOT:

  • A municipal entity - (Town of Smallville)
  • A business - (Nil’s Cafe)
  • Staff of a business - (Nil's Cafe and Staff)

About Our Programs

Rural Economic Development

Division Overview Rural Economic Development

 

North Carolina Main Street

NC Main Street Program Overview Video

 

Rural Planning

Rural Planning Program Overview Video

 

Funding

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Funding Opportunities

NC Department of Commerce: Rural Economic Development Division (REDD)

Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC)

ARC supports economic development activities in 31 North Carolina counties: Alexander, Alleghany, Ashe, Avery, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Catawba, Cherokee, Clay, Cleveland, Davie, Forsyth, Graham, Haywood, Henderson, Jackson, Macon, Madison, McDowell, Mitchell, Polk, Rutherford, Stokes, Surry, Swain, Transylvania, Watauga, Wilkes, Yadkin, and Yancey counties.

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG)

The Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) team, part of our Rural Economic Development Division, administers several federally-funded grant programs: Building Reuse program, using CDBG-Economic Development funds, Public Infrastructure grants, also from CDBG-Economic Development funds, Demolition grants, Disaster Recovery funds, including support to help communities deal with the COVID-19 coronavirusCommunity Housing Grants

NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center works in regions, counties, cities, towns, downtown districts, and in designated North Carolina Main Street communities, to inspire placemaking through building asset-based economic development strategies that achieve measurable results such as investment, business growth, and jobs.  The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center maintains a comprehensive grant funding guide (21 pages), available below.

Comprehensive Grant Funding and Resource Guide

Rural Grant Programs

The Rural Grant Programs team, part of our Rural Economic Development Division, administers several state-funded grant programs: The state Rural Building Reuse program, state Public Infrastructure grants, state Demolition grants, special, legislatively directed grants to local governments for downtown revitalization and economic development from 2017, 2018 and 2019, 2016 Disaster Recovery funds, Rural Housing Recovery Infrastructure Program.

Rural Transformation Grant Fund (NEW)

The Rural Transformation Grant Fund provides local governments with grants and expert guidance to improve economic vitality and overcome the unique challenges many rural communities face.  Open to local governments in the state's Tier 1 and Tier 2 counties, as well as qualified census tracts in Tier 3 counties.

Rural Transformation Grants can support:

  • Main Street and downtown investment and revitalization efforts;
  • Initiatives that help create resilient neighborhoods;
  • Community enhancements that spur economic growth;
  • Professional development and education programs to build local government capacity

Utility Account

The Utility Account assists local governments in counties that have one of the 80 most distressed rankings under G.S. 143B-437.08 after adjustments are applied for creating jobs in eligible industries. Funds are provided as incentives for job creation and investment to benefit industries eligible to participate in the Article 3J tax credit program. 

NC Department of Commerce

County Distress Ranking (Tiers)

The North Carolina Department of Commerce annually ranks the state’s 100 counties based on economic well-being and assigns each a Tier designation. This Tier system is incorporated into various state programs to encourage economic activity in the less prosperous areas of the state.  County Tiers are calculated using four factors: average unemployment rate, median household income, percentage growth in population, adjusted property tax base per capita.

Job Development Investment Grant (JDIG)

The Job Development Investment Grant (JDIG) is a performance-based, discretionary incentive program that provides cash grants directly to new and expanding companies to help offset the cost of locating or expanding a facility in the state.

One North Carolina Fund

The One North Carolina Fund (OneNC) is a discretionary cash-grant program that allows the Governor to respond quickly to competitive job-creation projects. The North Carolina Department of Commerce administers OneNC on behalf of the Governor. Awards are based on the number of jobs created, level of investment, location of the project, economic impact of the project and the importance of the project to the state and region.

Shell Buildings

Loans for industrial shell buildings are available from the Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) based on the projected number of jobs to be created and the level of distress in the community. These loans will be at a 2% interest rate with a maximum term of 5 years. Principle payments are deferred for the first two years of the loan. A dollar for dollar match is required by the local government applicant for an industrial shell building.

Other Grants:

GoldenLeaf Infrastructure Grants

The Golden LEAF Foundation, a North Carolina grant-making organization, helps eligible state, regional and local economic development entities with job creation projects in tobacco-dependent or economically distressed areas of the state.

Historic Tax Credits & Grants

Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits 

Historic Preservation Federal Fund Grants

Main Street Solutions Fund

Currently there are no additional funds available at this time

Background

The purpose of the fund is to provide maximum support to small businesses in designated micropolitans located in Tier 2 and Tier 3 counties and/or in designated North Carolina Main Street communities. The grants are used to assist planning agencies and small businesses with efforts to revitalize downtowns by creating jobs, funding infrastructure improvements and rehabilitating buildings.

At present, no additional funds are available through the Main Street Solutions Program. We hope to be able to provide new funding opportunities in the future.

Program Effectiveness

As of February 17, 2021, twenty-five communities have been awarded thirty-six Main Street Solutions Fund grants, totaling $4,818,476. For every $1 invested by the state, an additional $7.01 is anticipated to be invested by the local community. Sixty-five businesses will directly benefit from the Main Street Solutions grant program. Those businesses will create or retain a minimum of 761 permanent full-time and part-time jobs. The total projected investment is $47,191,445.

For further information on the Main Street Solutions Fund grant program, contact:

Liz Parham
NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center, Director
4346 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4346
Email: lparham@commerce.nc.gov
Work: (919) 814-4658  Cell:  (919) 805-2067

Main Street

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Main Street America Logo

NC Main Street is a Main Street America™ Coordinating Program.  As an original Main Street America™ Coordinating Program, NC Main Street has been helping revitalize older and historic commercial districts for more than 35 years. Today Main Street America™ is a network of more than 1,600 neighborhoods and communities, rural and urban, who share both a commitment to place and to building stronger communities through preservation-based economic development. Main Street America™ is a program of the nonprofit National Main Street Center, a subsidiary of the National Trust for Historic Preservation.

 

About NC Main Street

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center is the Main Street America coordinating program for the state.  NC Main Street staff are charged by the NC Department of Commerce to facilitate downtown economic development, using the Main Street America Four Point Approach, in designated communities.  

NC Main Street Staff Provide:

  • Strategic downtown economic development planning and technical assistance
  • Main Street program guidance
  • Downtown development education and training

In addition to helping communities implement the Main Street Four Point Approach, NC Main Street holds an annual three-day conference, open to anyone interested in downtown revitalization.About Main Street America

About Main Street AmericaTM

Main Street AmericaTM is a movement.

Main Street America™ has been helping revitalize older and historic commercial districts for more than 35 years. It is the leading voice for preservation-based economic develop-ment and community revitalization across the country. Made up of small towns, mid-sized communities, and urban commercial districts, Main Street America™ represents the broad diversity that makes this country so unique. Working together, the programs that make up the Main Street America™ network help to breathe new life into the places people call home.

Main Street AmericaTM is a mark of distinction.

It is a seal, recognizing that participating programs, organizations, and communities are part of a national movement with a proven track record for celebrating community character, preserving local history, and generating impressive economic returns. Since 1980, over 2,000 communities have been part of Main Street, bringing renewed energy and activity to America’s downtowns and commercial districts, securing $61 billion in new investment creating more than 525,000 net new jobs and rehabilitating 251,000 buildings.

Main Street AmericaTM is a time-tested strategy.

Main Street America™ communities are encouraged to make use of a time-tested approach, known as the Main Street Approach. The Main Street Approach is rooted in a commitment to broad-based community engagement, a holistic understanding of the factors that impact the quality of life in a community, and strategic focus on the core principles of downtown and neighborhood revitalization: Economic Vitality, Design, Promotion, and Organization.

Learn more about Main Street America

Statewide Reach

2022 Accredited Programs

The Main Street America accreditation process evaluates Main Street programs according to 10 performance standards and provides national accreditation to those that meet these standards. Congratulations to the communities below who met the criteria to receive this special designation.

Counties: A-F Counties: G-M Counties: N-S Counties: S-W

Albemarle

Goldsboro

New Bern

Sylva

Asheboro

Henderson

Newton

Tarboro

Belmont

Hendersonville

Reidsville

Tryon

Bessemer City

Hickory

Roanoke Rapids

Valdese

Boone

Laurinburg

Roxboro

Wake Forest

Brevard

Lenoir

Salisbury

Washington

Burlington

Lexington

Sanford

Wilson

Cherryville

Lumberton

Shelby

 

Clinton

Marion

Statesville

 

Concord

Monroe

 

 

Dunn

Mooresville

 

 

Eden

Morehead City

 

 

Edenton

Morganton

 

 

Elizabeth City

Mount Airy

 

 

Elkin

 

 

 

Fuquay-Varina

 

 

 

2021 Affiliate Programs

Main Street America™ Affiliates are programs that have demonstrated a commitment to achieving meaningful economic, social, physical, and organizational improvements in downtowns or neighborhood commercial districts. These are organizations that have committed to comprehensive revitalization and undertake ongoing efforts to achieve meaningful community outcomes.

Counties: A-K Counties: M-R Counties: R-W

Aberdeen

Manteo - for 2022

Rutherfordton

Ayden

Mocksville

Smithfield

Benson

Murphy - for 2022

Spruce Pine

Elon

North Wilkesboro

Troy

Forest City

Oxford

Waxhaw 

Garner

Pilot Mountain - for 2022

Waynesville

Hertford

Pittsboro - for 2022

Whiteville

Kinston

Rocky Mount

Williamston

 

Current Small Town Main Street Communities

Counties: B-P Counties: R-W Counties: W-Z

Belhaven

Roseboro

Wilkesboro

Hayesville

Spring Hope

 

Mount Olive

Warrenton

 

Pymouth

West Jefferson

 

About

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center's Downtown Associate Community program (DAC) launched in May 2015.   The DAC program is the first step towards the      NC Main Street Designation.  State staff work with eligible communities to equip them with the tools to build a sustainable organizational foundation and conduct strategic economic development planning, which strengthens their downtown development efforts. 

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center selects communities every other year via a competitive application process.  North Carolina municipalities, with an identifiable traditional downtown business district and a certified population under 50,000 not already designated as a Main Street or Small Town Main Street community are eligible to apply to the Center for services under the Downtown Associate Community program.  Selected communities will receive three years of downtown revitalization technical assistance services from the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center and may have the opportunity to move up to Main Street designation upon successful completion of the program. 

Current Downtown Associate Community Communities

1. Mebane
2. Zebulon

Important Dates

Deadlines

  • Applications Due: Closed for Current Cycle
  • Site Visits: Closed for Current Cycle
  • Notifications Sent Out: Closed for Current Cycle

Program Information

Workshops

Closed for Current Cycle

Application

Questions?

Contact Sherry Adams or Chuck Halsall

Pathway to Main Street Designation:

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center selects communities every other year for the Downtown Associate Community program (DAC), via a competitive application process.  

The Downtown Associate Community program is the process through which North Carolina communities may become affiliated with the NC Main Street program.  The Downtown Associate Community program is based on the National Main Street Center's downtown revitalization model using the Main Street Approach™.  State staff work with eligible communities to equip them with the tools to build a sustainable organizational foundation and conduct strategic economic development planning, which strengthens their downtown development efforts. 

For more information about applying to the NC Main Street Program, Liz Parham

 

About the Annual NC Main Street Conference

The North Carolina Main Street Conference is an annual 3-day conference, held within a beautiful rural community of NC. The venue changes each year, as do the speakers, sponsors and class offerings. The conference is open to anyone interested in learning about downtown economic development. Attendees gain knowledge from networking with other downtown enthusiast and from class offerings, facilitated by an impressive lineup of downtown professionals. The NC Main Street Awards Ceremony showcases the top projects in the state while the NC Main Street Champions Ceremony recognizes citizens and groups that have made an impact in their community's downtown revitalization efforts. The NC Annual Main Street Conference is one of the many educational offerings, provided by the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center, a division within the state's NC Department of Commerce.

Links

NC Main Street Annual Conference Website

Become An Exhibitor or Sponsor

Main Street Awards

Main Street Champions

Director

Liz Parham, CMSM
Director, NC Main Street and Rural Planning Center
4346 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4346
Email: lparham@commerce.nc.gov
Office: (919) 814-4658
Cell:  (919) 805-2067

Main Street Staff

Sherry Adams, CMSM
Manager, NC Main Street Program
Coordinator, Downtown Programming and Technical Assistance 
48 Grove Street, Asheville, NC 27835
Email: sadams@commerce.nc.gov
Office: (828) 251-6200
Cell:  (828) 747-8218

Will Best
Special Project Coordinator
4346 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4346
Email:wbest@commerce.nc.gov
Office: (919) 814-4676
Cell:  (919) 365-0298

Mike Dougherty
Specialist, Downtown Development
4346 Mail Service Center Raleigh, NC 27699
Email: mike.dougherty@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:   (336) 613-4941

Charles Halsall
Downtown Programming and Technical Assistance Coordinator
105 Pactolus Hwy., Greenville, NC 27835
Email: chalsall@commerce.nc.gov
Cell: (252) 214-5132

Naomi Riley
Administrator, Main Street Solutions Fund
Downtown Services Coordinator
4346 Mail Service Center, Raleigh, NC 27699-4346
Email: naomi.riley@commerce.nc.gov
Office: (919) 814-4726 
Cell: (984) 222-5292

Stay Connected!

Rural Planning

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Rural Planning Program Overview

Part of the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center (MS&RP Center), the Rural Planning program works with municipalities, county governments, and other organizations in rural areas to provide strategic economic development planning and implementation services, technical support, and training.  Such services help communities prepare for and respond to potential economic growth opportunities in ways that improve quality of life and prosperity, build community capacity, and maintain the character of rural areas. Rural Planning program staff located in North Carolina’s eight Prosperity Zones facilitate economic development planning for communities and have developed relationships with local leaders in all 100 counties. Prosperity Zone planners work in regions throughout the state: the West (Sylva), Northwest (Morganton), Piedmont-Triad (Winston-Salem), Southwest (Albemarle), North Central (Clayton), Sandhills/South Central (Fayetteville), Northeast (Greenville), and Southeast (Morehead City). The map below shows contact information for Prosperity Zone planners. Other Rural Planning program staff are based in Asheville, Raleigh, and Wilmington. See the "Contacts" tab for a full staff list.

NC Prosperity Zones

Services & Assistance Available

The Rural Planning program provides the following economic development planning services and assistance to municipalities, county governments, and other organizations in rural areas of North Carolina.

Strategic Economic Development Planning & Implementation Services

  • Community Economic Recovery and Resiliency Initiative (CERRI)  [New in 2021]
  • Community economic development assessments
  • Five-year strategic plan and program development
  • One-day strategic planning workshops
  • Implementation plan development
  • Resource identification

 

Technical Support

  • Community economic opportunities mapping and analysis
  • Local policy and ordinance review related to economic development
  • Custom GIS mapping
  • Other economic development planning assistance

 

Training and Education

  • Workshops and other regional and statewide training opportunities
  • Community-specific training for project development and implementation
  • Research and information sharing

For more information about Rural Planning program services or to discuss your community's specific needs, please contact Darren Rhodes, Rural Planning Program Manager, at drhodes@commerce.nc.gov, or the Prosperity Zone planner assigned to your region.

Strategic Economic Development Planning & Implementation Services

Community Economic Recovery and Resiliency Initiative (CERRI) 

Click on link in bulleted list, above, to go to CERRI tab for more information.

 

Community Economic Development Assessment Program (CEDAP)

Purpose:  The CEDAP is a short-term, efficient assessment to "jump-start" communities' economic development efforts by providing action items. These action items help communities achieve tangible outputs and outcomes in a short period of time, at minimal cost.

Process:  A CEDAP is developed based on needs identified from meetings, visits, and telephone calls with the town, city, or county unit of government (local government). Staff from the Rural Planning Program (RPP) of the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center will conduct the assessment. Typically, three community visits will be needed, with participation by the local government staff and an established local work group. All meetings, including a community tour, can be held remotely (via teleconference). The RPP is available for technical assistance, facilitation, and other services the community may need as it implements CEDAP action items.

Deliverables:  The local government will receive a final report containing data and information, such as a community economic snapshot, considered during the assessment. The report will summarize results of activities conducted during the assessment including community asset mapping, identification of economic drivers, SWOT analysis, stakeholder interviews, business questionnaires, and local work group discussions. The report will also provide action items the community can achieve within a one- to two-year timeframe. The community can build upon the CEDAP to formulate and achieve additional goals in future years.

Outcomes and Impacts:  The CEDAP adds value to a community’s economic development efforts by developing consensus around the most important issues to be addressed and by creating specific actions on how they will be addressed and by whom. Examples of measurable impacts of such actions may include economic investment (public/private), jobs created/retained, new businesses recruited/started, and/or new (or expansion of existing) economic development programs or initiatives started.

For more information about the Rural Planning program's services or to discuss your community's specific needs, please contact Darren Rhodes, Rural Planning Program Manager, at drhodes@commerce.nc.gov, or the Prosperity Zone planner assigned to your region.

 

Five-Year Economic Development Strategic Plans (EDSP) and Program Development

Purpose: The Five-Year EDSP is a longer-term guide that reflects a community’s goals for building and growing its economy and establishes a path for doing so. The EDSP timeframe is five years, and the plan should include a visioning (economic positioning) statement, strategies with goals, objectives, and actions, an implementation plan, and a monitoring and evaluation process.

Process:  Staff of the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center’s Rural Planning Program (RPP) will facilitate the EDSP development process with participation by the town, city, or county unit of government (local government) and an established local work group. The planning process will include presentations of economic and other data as well as activities such as asset mapping, identification of economic drivers, SWOT analysis, stakeholder interviews, business questionnaires, and local work group discussions. Typically, the process takes three to five meetings, and works best if the local work group meets regularly to maintain the interest and focus of its members. All meetings, including a community tour, can be held remotely (via teleconference). The RPP is available for technical assistance, facilitation, and other services the community may need as it develops and implements its plan.

Deliverables:  The local government will receive a Five-Year EDSP, with a community vision (economic positioning statement), strategies, goals, and objectives, plus a One-Year Implementation Plan with actions the community intends to take over a 12-month period to ensure the goals and objectives are reached. The RPP recommends the community establish a monitoring and evaluation process to track plan implementation progress.

Outcomes and Impacts:  The EDSP adds value to a community’s economic development efforts by developing consensus around the most important issues to be addressed and by creating specific actions on how they will be addressed and by whom. Measurable outcomes from a successfully implemented EDSP may include economic investment (public/private), jobs created/retained, new businesses recruited/started, and/or new (or expansion of existing) economic development programs or initiatives started.

For more information about the Rural Planning program's services or to discuss your community's specific needs, please contact Darren Rhodes, Rural Planning Program Manager, at drhodes@commerce.nc.gov, or the Prosperity Zone planner assigned to your region.

 

One-Day Action Planning Workshops

Purpose:  A One-Day Action Planning Workshop facilitates a conversation between local economic development leaders to identify and prioritize areas of focus, develop consensus around goals, and create implementation actions. It works best in communities that have an established economic development program with identified leaders interested in developing consensus on goals and actions for a specified period. It is not intended to be comprehensive or long-range, or to address community services beyond economic development.

Process:  Staff of the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center’s Rural Planning Program (RPP) will facilitate a one day (four to six-hour) strategic action planning session with local economic development leaders and stakeholders. The Action Planning Workshop can be held remotely (via teleconference). The RPP is available for technical assistance and other services the community may need as it develops and implements its Action Plan.

Deliverables:  The community will receive a report summarizing the Action Planning Workshop and an Economic Development Action Plan outlining short-term focus areas, goals, and implementation actions. The RPP recommends the community monitor and evaluate its Action Plan implementation progress.

Outcomes and Impacts:  The One-Day Action Planning Workshop adds value to a community’s economic development program by helping it develop consensus around short-term actions to maintain a strong, diverse local economy which provides job opportunities, enhances the local tax base, and improves quality of life. Measurable outcomes from a One-Day Action Planning Workshop and implementation of the resulting Action Plan include economic investment (public/private), jobs created/retained, new businesses recruited/started, and/or new (or expansion of existing) economic development programs or initiatives started.

For more information about the Rural Planning program's services or to discuss your community's specific needs, please contact Darren Rhodes, Rural Planning Program Manager, at drhodes@commerce.nc.gov, or the Prosperity Zone planner assigned to your region.

Community Economic Recovery & Resiliency Initiative (CERRI)

BackgroundCurrent CERI Communities

In response to the economic challenges communities have faced because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center's Rural Planning program (RPP) developed the Community Economic Recovery & Resiliency Initiative (CERRI).  The initiative, launched in January 2021, is intended to help small towns and rural communities recover from the economic impacts of the pandemic and build local economies that are more resilient to future crises.  Through CERRI, the RPP provides participating communities with a planning process to develop local economic recovery strategies and technical assistance to implement them.  Key CERRI services offered by the RPP include conducting a community assessment; facilitating development of an economic recovery plan of work to build local economic resiliency and support small businesses; and providing guidance and assistance, as needed, with plan of work implementation.

The RPP has engaged 28 communities in CERRI: the first 12 in 2021 (shown as "Initial" on the map) and 16 more in 2022 (shown as "New" on the map). 

Quarterly Impact Reports

The RPP prepares CERRI Impact Reports on a quarterly basis. Links to available reports are shown below.

CERRI Quarterly Impact Reports
2021 Quarter 1 Quarter 2  Quarter 3 Quarter 4
2022 Quarter 1      

CERRI Contacts

For more information about CERRI, please contact Darren Rhodes, Rural Planning Program Manager, at drhodes@commerce.nc.gov, or the Prosperity Zone planner assigned to your region.

Technical Assistance

  • Community Economic Opportunities Mapping and Analysis
  • Local Policy and Ordinance Review Related to Economic Opportunities
  • Planning Assistance Related to Economic Development
  • GIS Mapping and Analysis

Training & Education

 

Rural Solutions Workshop Series

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center’s Rural Planning program developed its Rural Solutions Workshop Series - Best Practices for Small Town Economic Development to provide the state’s smaller and resource-limited rural communities with information and tools to help them grow their local economies.

The first workshop in the series, Recruiting Retail Businesses, offered tools and tips on evaluating local markets, identifying types of businesses to attract, locating appropriate land for development, and communicating with prospective businesses, including regional and national chains. Biscoe hosted the workshop in January 2019 and Smithfield hosted it in Setpember 2019. Thanks to the support of partners, from knowledgeable workshop speakers to generous host communities, the Rural Planning program was able to offer the workshops at no cost to participants.

Below are materials from the Recruiting Retail Businesses workshop held in Smithfield in September 2019.   

Workshop

Date

Materials

Recruiting Retail Businesses - Smithfield

09/26/2019

Agenda

Presentation Slides (1 per page)

Presentation Slides (2 per page)

NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center - Rural Planning Program Overview

NC Department of Commerce Grants & Incentives

Funding Opportunities & Resources

Funding Opportunities

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center maintains a Comprehensive Grant Funding and Resource Guide for downtown and rural economic development. To access the guide, click HERE to go to the Funding Opportunities section on this page (or scroll up the page to the Funding Opportunities tab under FUNDING) and look for the link below the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center description.

Resources

COVID-19 Resources
Planning for Healthy Communities

Consistent with its mission, the NC Department of Commerce sponsored preparation of a guidebook on integrating healthy planning principles into local comprehensive plans. The Guidebook on Local Planning for Healthy Communities, published in 2013, has statewide applicability and provides technical assistance to municipalities and counties in solving local planning problems. Its focus is on multiple dimensions of healthy community planning, but it goes further to serve as a resource guide for towns, cities, and counties in preparing a variety of local plans in addition to comprehensive plans.

 

Rural Planning Program Contacts  NC Prosperity Zones

Darren Rhodes, CPM 
Rural Planning Program Administrator
Community Economic Development Planner, Piedmont-Triad Prosperity Zone
525 Vine Street, Suite 240
Winston-Salem, NC 27101
Email:    drhodes@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:       (336) 618-5117

Ann Bass
ARC Community Economic Development Planner, Western Prosperity Zone
253 Webster Road
Sylva, NC 28779
Email:   ann.bass@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:      (828) 508-0107
Read Ann’s Profile

Kyle Case
ARC Community Economic Development Planner, Northwest Prosperity Zone
720 E. Union Street, Morganton, NC
Email:  kyle.case@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:     (984) 275-5209

Jeff Emory
Community Economic Development Planner, Southwest Prosperity Zone
615 Concord Road
Albemarle, NC 28001
Email:     jeff.emory@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:        (704) 984-3666
Read Jeff’s Profile

Grace Lawrence
Community Economic Development Planner, Sandhills (South Central) Prosperity Zone
NCWorks Career Center
414 Ray Avenue
Fayetteville, NC 28301
Email:   grace.lawrence@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:      (910) 391-1298

Glen Locascio
GIS Analyst
48 Grove Street
Asheville, NC 28801
Email:    glocascio@@commerce.nc.gov
Office:   (828) 251-6200, ext. 224

Bruce Naegelen
Community Economic Development Planner, North Central Prosperity Zone
8998 US 70 Hwy Business West, Suite 100
Clayton, NC 27520
Email:    bruce.naegelen@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:       (984) 365-0279
Read Bruce’s Profile

Lee Padrick
Chief Planner
Community Economic Development Planner, Northeast Prosperity Zone
105 Pactolus Hwy. (NC 330
Greenville, NC 27835 (physical address)
PO Box 1587
Greenville, NC 27835 (mailing address)
Email:    lpadrick@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:       (252) 565-2060
Read Lee’s Profile

Karen Smith, AICP
Coordinator, Rural Solutions
48 Grove Street
Asheville, NC 28801
Email:    ksmith@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:       (828) 747-1585

Amy Suggs
Community Economic Development Planner, Southeast Prosperity Zone
3813 Arendell Street
Morehead City, NC 28540
Email:    amy.suggs@commerce.nc.gov
Cell:       (910) 530-0278

Mark Zeigler, AICP
Community Economic Development Planner
127 Cardinal Drive Extension
Wilmington, NC 28405
Email:    mzeigler@commerce.nc.gov
Office:   (910) 796-7268
Cell:       (910) 632-4011

Full NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center Staff Directory (PDF)

Past Project Documents

Below are links to economic development strategic plans and other project documents prepared for communities in the past few years by the Rural Planning program. The documents are grouped by county.

Economic Development Strategic Plans and Documents

Ashe County

Lansing Five-Year Economic Development Strategic Plan (2018-2022) & Year One Implementation Plan (2018-2019)

Bladen County

Bladenboro Economic Development Strategic Five-Year Plan 2018-2023

Carteret County

Carteret County Economic Development Action Plan 2016 to 2021

Pine Knoll Shores Asset Mapping Report, July 2017

Clay County

Clay County Tourism Economy Development Plan (2019)

Columbus County

Chadbourn Economic Development Strategic Plan 2017-2022

Job Creation Plan for Distressed Communities in Columbus County, NC (2019)

Currituck County

Currituck County Economic Development Plan (2017)

Edgecombe County

Princeville Report of Economic Positioning Vision Forum (2019)

Tarboro Economic Development Strategic Five-Year Plan 2019 – 2023 (2019)

Franklin County

Town of Franklinton Economic Development Strategic Five-Year Plan 2019 – 2023 (2019)

Franklinton Downtown Assessment (2019)

Louisburg Strategic Economic Development Plan (2017)

Northeast Franklin County Economic Strategy (2018)

Granville County

Oxford Downtown Economic Development Implementation Plan Technical Assistance Report (2018)

Guilford County

Archdale Economic Development Strategic Plan (2018-2023) & Year One Implementation Plan (2018-2019)

Halifax County

Enfield Economic Development Implementation Plan 2018 – 2019

Halifax Economic Strategy (2018)

Littleton Economic Strategy (2018)

Harnett County

Coats Report of Economic Development Assessment (2019)

Hertford County

Ahoskie Economic Strategy (Draft - 2018)

Jackson County

Dillsboro Five-Year Economic Development Strategic Plan (2017-2021) & Year One Implementation Plan (2017-2018)

Sylva Five-Year Economic Development Strategic Plan (2017-2021) & Year One Implementation Plan (2017-2018)

Johnston County

Implementation Report on 2017 Benson Economic Development Strategic Plan Objectives #14 & #17 (2019)

Jones County

Pollocksville Economic Strategy (2016)

Martin County

Parmele Economic Strategy (2017)

Mitchell County

Mitchell Works: An Economic Development Strategic Plan for Mitchell County (2016)

Summary Document - Mitchell Works: An Economic Development Strategic Plan for Mitchell County (2016)

Montgomery County

Biscoe Report of Economic Development Assessment (2018)

Moore County

Cameron Report of Economic Positioning Vision Forum (2018)

Richmond County

Hoffman Report of Economic Development Assessment (2018)

Robeson County

Maxton Economic Development Strategic Plan (2019)

Red Springs Economic Assessment and Recommendations (2019)

Rowan County

China Grove Report of Economic Development Assessment (2018)

Sampson County

Clinton Economic Development Strategic Five-Year Plan 2019 – 2023 (2018)

Surry County

Town of Pilot Mountain Economic Development Action Plan (2018-2019)

Yadkin County

Boonville Economic Development Strategic Plan (2017-2021) & Year One Implementation Plan (2017-2018)

Boonville Economic Development Strategic Plan (2017-2021) & Year Two Implementation Plan (2018-2019)

 

Creating Outdoor Recreation Economies (CORE)

The NC Department of Commerce’s Main Street & Rural Planning Center announces a technical assistance program offering Outdoor Recreation Economy Strategic Planning and Asset Development services.

The program will offer planning and asset development to leverage the abundant outdoor recreation resources available across the state of North Carolina to bolster local economic vitality. This will be accomplished through focusing on activities communities can do to: Increase tourism; Encourage small business development; Position communities to attract outdoor gear manufacturing industries; Plan for outdoor recreation asset and infrastructure development; and Enhance quality of life improvements for residents.

In North Carolina, outdoor recreation is a big economic driver!
•    $9.9 Billion in total Outdoor Recreation Value Added economic impact within North Carolina
•    123,647 direct jobs statewide in the Outdoor Recreation associated employment categories
•    $5.2 Billion in wages and compensation for North Carolina workers

How can your community benefit from this dynamic economic sector?

Creating Outdoor Recreation Economies (CORE) Application

Apply

Creating Outdoor Recreation Economies (CORE) Primary Contact

David McRae
Appalachian Regional Commission Assistant Program Manager
North Carolina Department of Commerce
919-814-4672    office
984-365-0853    mobile
david.mcrae@commerce.nc.gov

FAQs

What is an outdoor recreation economy?

The outdoor recreation economy is a broad economic sector that includes consumer spending on things such as guides, outfitters, and equipment. Outdoor recreation also fuels employment and consumer spending in other sectors such as manufacturing, retail, transportation, food service, tourism, travel, and more. There are also other intangible and harder to quantify economic benefits of outdoor recreation that include improved physical and mental health and attracting residents and workforce talent. All of which can make your community a more desirable place to live, work, and play.

How can community and economic development planning enhance a local outdoor recreation economy?

The strategic planning process will provide an economic vision developed with input from community leaders and public participation.

The visioning process will identify recommendations and activities to build an ecosystem of places where people participate in outdoor recreation, small business support, outdoor recreation infrastructure that increases quality of life for residents, tourism, creative placemaking, and more. These elements work together to increase economic opportunity and community vitality.

Is there grant funding available through this program?

No. There is no direct grant funding available under this program. However, identifying potential funding opportunities is a component of the strategic planning process.

What does a community need to do to engage with the Rural Planning Center for these services?

  • A representative of the local government must complete a brief application. 
  • A Memorandum of Understanding approved by the local governing board is required to engage the NC Department of Commerce’s Main Street & Rural Planning Center in the planning process.

What is expected from communities who participate in this program?

  • A representative from the unit of local government to serve as the primary point of contact.
  • Approval of a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) by the local governing board is required.
  • Collaboration with the Rural Planning Center to form a stakeholder’s group to provide input and steer the planning process.
  • Collaboration with the Rural Planning Center to gather other public participation and input during the planning process.

What is the duration of the strategic planning process?

We will tailor the strategic planning process to meet the needs of each individual community. Therefore, the duration of each planning process will vary from community to community.

What are the benefits of strategically planning to enhance your local outdoor recreation economy?

  • Outdoor recreation is a big economic driver in North Carolina:

    • $9.9 Billion in total Outdoor Recreation Value Added economic impact within North Carolina in 2020.
    • 123,647 direct jobs statewide in the Outdoor Recreation associated employment categories
    • $5.2 Billion in wages and compensation for North Carolina workers
    • In 2017, Outdoor Recreation in NC resulted in $28 Billion in total consumer spending
  • People want to participate in outdoor recreation of all kinds:
    • Nationwide, 7.1 million more Americans participated in outdoor recreation in 2020 than in the year prior.
    • 56% of North Carolinians participate in some form of outdoor recreation each year.
    • This includes more than 22.8 million visitors to North Carolina State Parks in 2021 — three million more than any other year on record.
  • Quality of Life for Residents:
    • People want to live, work, and play in communities with high quality of life, and increasingly this includes access to outdoor recreation. 
    • There are numerous benefits to participating in outdoor recreation including physical and mental health, workforce recruitment, and enhanced community placemaking.

What types of people and organizations should be included during the planning process?

A diverse stakeholder group that represents the broad spectrum associated with the outdoor recreation economic ecosystem will achieve the most successful strategic planning outcomes. Ideally this group will remain together as a cohesive entity after the completion of the plan to continue work on implementing recommendations. Not all groups are required to be represented on the primary stakeholder group, and input from certain sectors can be provided via surveys and other public input methods. But a diverse cross-section will be beneficial to the planning process.

  • Local government leaders
  • Economic development professionals
  • Tourism Development Authority
  • Chambers of Commerce or local business owners
  • Recreation user groups (Friends of Parks, bicycle groups, hiking clubs, scouts, etc.)
  • Education (K12, Community College, University, applicable youth programs)
  • Parks and Recreation
  • Environmental/Conservation Groups (Land Trusts, Riverkeepers)
  • Public Land Management Agencies (State Parks, National Forest, Wildlife Resource Commission)
  • Entrepreneurship support organizations (SBTDCs, Small Business Centers, CDFIs)

What are the program deliverables that a community will receive at the end of the process?

There are a variety of final products that a community will be provided at the end of a strategic planning process including:

  • Outdoor Recreation Economy Strategic Plan - The plan will include elements that focus on how recreational assets can be leveraged to increase economic and community vitality. The plan will contain background information, data obtained from public input, and recommendations to implement the findings which will help the community enhance their local outdoor recreation economy.
  • Asset Mapping – an inventory of all outdoor recreation and associated industry assets available within a community will be identified. This inventory will convey details about the asset that will enable community leaders to best leverage their assets to support economic development.
  • Training – There will be training opportunities for community stakeholders to increase knowledge of strategies to grow economic opportunity based around outdoor recreation.

Additional Information

Funding for this program made possible by the US Economic Development Administration

Creating Outdoor Recreation Economies (CORE)

For Designated Main Street Communities

Tab/Accordion Item

NC Main Street Communities Map

Coming Soon

Training Requirements

Orientation

Required to attend: New MS Directors/New STMS Coordinators

  • Must attend the Main Street Orientation, held virtually each month, within three months of start date (if not previously attended)
  • Sign Up

Basic Training

Required to attend: New MS Directors/New STMS Coordinators
Encouraged to attend: Staff, Board Members, Committee Members, Volunteers

  • Must attend all four of the MS Basic Trainings, within the first year of employment  1) Economic Vitality   2) Design   3) Promotion   4) Organization

  • Sign Up

Directors Meeting

Required to attend:  Main Street Directors 
Encouraged to attend:  Staff

  • ALL Main Street Directors must attend the NC Main Street Directors’ Meeting held once a year in August
  • In the case of a vacancy or illness/emergency, a substitution for the director may be made for this meeting
  • Sign Up

Regional Meeting

Required to attend:  MS Directors/STMS Coordinators 
Encouraged to attend: Staff

  • Main Street Directors and Small Town Main Street Coordinator must attend a minimum of one of two Regional Meetings each year. (Held in July and October) 
  • If the Director or Coordinator cannot attend, a volunteer can attend in their place
  • Sign Up

NC Main Street Conference

Required to attend:  Main Street Directors AND a minimum of one volunteer, Small Town Main Street Coordinators
Encouraged to attend:  Anyone interested in downtown revitalization

  • Main Street Directors and a minimum of one volunteer must attend the annual NC Main Street Conference - NCMS provides each designated MS community with two complimentary registrations
  • Small Town Main Street Coordinators must attend the annual N.C. Main Street Conference - NCMS provides each designated STMS community with one complimentary registrationTraining Calendar
  • Sign Up

Deadlines

  • January 5, 2022 - Program Assessments (MS/STMS) - Not Required for 2021 Due to COVID-19
  • June 1, 2022 - Trademark Agreements (MS/STMS) - Nation Main Street Sends This Request
  • June 30, 2022 - Annual Agreements (MS/STMS)
  • July 29, 2022 - Program Statistics (MS/STMS)
  • September 30, 2022 - Award Nominations (MS/STMS)
  • September 30, 2022 - Champion Nominations (MS)

Main Street Communities

Annual Agreement Instructions:  Designated Main Street & Small Town Main Street communities must sign the Annual Agreement through DocuSign.  The fully executed document must be received by its deadline to remain active in the program.  Once you receive the email from DocuSign, please do not delay in signing the agreement and verify that your City/Town Manager has signed it in order to receive your copy of the fully executed document by its deadline.

Process:

  1. Program Director will receive an email with the agreement through DocuSign.  Director will sign the agreement.  Agreement will automatically be emailed to the City/Town Manager. DIRECTORS - It is important that you contact the City/Town Manager and let them know you have sent the document for their signature.  If they do not sign, the document may not be received by the deadline.
  2. City/Town Manager will sign the agreement.  Agreement is now fully executed.
  3. A copy of the fully executed document will automatically go back to the Program Director, City/Town Manager, and NC Main Street.
  4. A signed document confirms that the local Main Street program has a thorough understanding of the benefits and requirements of active participation in the NC Main Street program.  

Small Town Main Street Communities 

Process:

  1. Program Coordinators will receive an email with the agreement through DocuSign.  Director will sign the agreement.  Agreement will automatically be emailed to the City/Town Manager. COORDINATORS - It is important that you contact the City/Town Manager and let them know you have sent the document for their signature.  If they do not sign, the document may not be received by the deadline.
  2. City/Town Manager will sign the agreement.  Agreement is now fully executed.
  3. A copy of the fully executed document will automatically go back to the Program Coordinator, City/Town Manager, and NC Main Street.
  4. A signed document confirms that the local Small Town Main Street program has a thorough understanding of the benefits and requirements of active participation in the NC Small Town Main Street program.   

Local Program Structure:

Each community in the NC Main Street program is required to manage their local program within one of the following structures:  (1) Non-profit managed, (2) Town managed, or (3) Quasi managed - Combination of non-profit and town

Below is the current list of our program participant's, local management structure

Town Structure List

National Main Street Licensing Agreement

The Annual Licensing Agreement is between you, the local NC programs (Main Street & Small Town Main Street) and the National Main Street Center.  *Downtown Associate Community programs, are not required to sign the licensing agreement.

Process:

  • Main Street & Small Town Main Street program directors/coordinators will receive an email from Steve Amraen via echosign@echosign.com with the Annual National Main Street Licensing Agreement.  
  • Main Street & Small Town Main Street program directors/coordinators will sign the agreement.  The agreement will automatically go to Liz Parham to sign.  
  • Liz Parham will sign the agreement. The fully executed agreement will automatically go back to the program director/coordinator, Liz and to the National Main Street Center. 
  • If you DO NOT get an agreement, email Steve Amraen and copy Liz Parham.

Program Assessment Survey

Due:  January 5, 2022 by 5pm  

The Program Assessment Survey is a tool we use to review your annual progress as a designated NC Main Street community.   Each community will receive a Program Report Card, based off of your Assessment.  Please do not wait until the last minute to do your Assessment. We cannot stress enough that each Assessment be accurate.  If questioned, you must have documentation to support your submission.   Failure to submit the Assessment could lead to inactive status for your community.

  • Below is the Program Assessment Survey link for calendar year:  January 1 - December 31, 2021
  • Assessments must be completed in their entirety
  • Complete the Budget and Salary survey section based on YOUR CURRENT budget:   January 1 - December 31, 2021  OR  July 1, 2020 - June 30, 2021
  • Scan the assessment and all supporting attachments into one PDF document
  • Submit the assessment through email to Sherry Adams

Questions?

Feel free to call or email our staff.

Troubleshooting

  • The NC Department of Commerce does not use Dropbox or Google Docs, therefore you cannot submit through those sites
  • If your file is too large to email, email us.  We will send you a link, to upload the pdf to our Commerce sharefile system

Thank you for all your efforts to move your downtown forward.

Forms

Main Street Program Assessment Form - Sample 

Small Town Main Street Program Assessment Form - Sample 

Online Statistics Reporting:

Due:  July 29, 2022 by 5pm  

Please Read Carefully

  • If you have moved from one NC Main Street community to another NC Main Street community, you MUST obtain a new NCID number.  You are considered a "New Director" to that town so your old NCID number will not work.
  • Please scroll to the bottom of this page if you have issues with NCID.  There is a "Help" section that has their phone number and other contact information.   The NC Main Street staff do not have access to the NCID systems.  

Online Portal

  • Opens:  July 1, 2022  (Must have secured your NCID prior to July 1 - See instructions below)

  • Portal Locks:  July 29, 2022 - 5pm 

Current Annual Statistics Reports

NCID Instructions & Password Recovery: 

New Directors: NCID Registration Process

  • Step 1

  • Step 2

    • Select the registration category “Business”.

    • Do not select the category “Local Government Employee”, as this is for specific agencies, and does not allow self-registration.

    • Do not select the category “Individual” as this registration will not provide adequate information required for by the Main Street reporting system.

    • Use of the category “Business” is allowed for this reporting system, and provides the information required.

  • Step 3

    • Once you click on the “Business” category button, you will be directed to the registration page.

    • Complete and submit the requested information, which includes the user ID and password that you would like to use.

    • We suggest a personal user id – such as johndoe, etc.

    • Write down and remember your user ID and your password. You will need this to log in year-after-year, so it is very important that you remember it, or you will have to get a new password.

    • The system is within State government, but external to Commerce, therefore we will not be able to reset it for you. You will have to go back into NCID and request it be reset.

  • Step 4

    • NCID will send you an email containing a “Complete Registration” button.

    • You must take the following steps to complete registration before your User ID and password can be used

    • Click on the “Complete Registration” button and you should be directed back to an NCID page.

    • On the NCID page, click on the box that verifies you are not a robot.

    • Follow any additional instructions, if present, and you should be taken to a page where you will select five security questions and answers.

    • Once you have selected your five questions and answers, click on the “Save” button that will appear, then follow any remaining instructions (there may not be any).

    • At this point, your NCID page should indicate that your registration is complete.

  • Step 5

    • Once you have registered your NCID username and password, you can verify that it is active by going to the NCID sign-in page and signing in again.  ncid.nc.gov

  • Step 6

    • Once you have confirmed your NCID credentials, the process for establishing credentials is complete.

 

Previous Year Reporting Directors:

  • Password Issues

    • Contact NCID to change your password.  Unfortunately for security purposes, we can’t help you with that part.  Look on the NCID Tech Sheet for the contact information.

 

Statistics Online Reporting Instructions:

Important Information For All:

  • Use the Main Street TRACKING FORM and update your statistical data for the period of July 1, 2021-June 30, 2022.   
  • Use the STATISTICS WORKSHEET and enter your cumulative statistic numbers for EACH category. 
    • If you received a state, federal, county, city or town grant for a project in downtown this year – that counts as public investment.
    • If you received a nonprofit grant that is private investment.
    • If businesses are temporarily closed and if jobs are furloughed due to COVID but not permanently eliminated, then they will not be counted as losses.
    • Only count permanent business losses and job losses in your annual statistics.  

New Directors Reporting Directions:

  • Complete the NCID registration process above
  • Once you set up your NCID, go to the reporting portal, Reporting Portal (nccommerce.com) 
    • Select login at the bottom of the page.  
    • Select which town you are associated with
    • NC Main Street Staff will then approve your registration  (this may take up to 24 hours)
    • Once approved, you will get an email confirmation.
  • Log back in again through the same portal, Reporting Portal (nccommerce.com) 
    • Select the blue log in button in the bottom left
    • This time, you will be able to see the reporting page. 
    • Review your TRACKING FORM and STATISTICS WORKSHEET 
    • Enter your statistics 

Previous Year Reporting Directors Directions:

Downtown Associate Community:

  • Downtown Associate Community programs are required to submit their statistics on the STATISTICS WORKSHEET, not online.  

FORMS

Help

NC Main Street Annual Awards Submission

For Designated Main Street and Small Town Main Street Communities ONLY

 

Overview:

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center is proud to present the annual NC Main Street Awards competition, recognizing the hard work, dedication and success of our NC Main Street communities and their achievements in the Four Points of the Main Street Approach® to downtown revitalization: Economic Vitality, Design, Promotion, and Organization.

Entry Deadline:

September 30, 2022  | 5pm

Awards Ceremony:

March 15, 2023 | Statesville

Eligibility:

Any active NC Main Street community that met the statistics deadline for the most recent fiscal year

Projects must have been completed within the past two years of the submission date

Guidelines:

  • Each community may submit up to five nominations for downtown district projects
  • A project may be entered in only one category
  • The jury reserves the right to move an entry to a different category, if they feel there is a more appropriate fit
  • The jury reserves the right to withhold an award in any category or to designate more than one winner if they deem appropriate
  • Any previously nominated project that did not receive an award and still meets the two-year time limit may be resubmitted
  • All construction projects must meet the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation
  • All materials will become property of the NC Main Street and Rural Planning Center
  • Nominations must include the Main Street Director’s electronic signature. By signing the online submission, the Main Street Director acknowledges the submission is on behalf of their town/board of directors

Instructions:

Submissions will ONLY be accepted by the Local Main Street Directors/Local Small Town Main Street Coordinators.

Main Street Submissions

Small Town Main Street Submissions

Annual NC Main Street Champion Nominations - Designated Main Street Communities ONLY

Deadline

September 30, 2022 by 5pm

About the Designation

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center is proud to annually recognize the efforts of dedicated individuals who have contributed to the success of the local programs across our state. A non-competitive award, the NC Main Street Champion designation honors those persons who have made extraordinary contributions to their downtown. The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center will individually recognize Champions with a video presentation and commemorative certificates celebrating this special honor during the Annual NC Main Street Conference.

Watch the NC Main Street Champion Nomination Video

NC Main Street Champion Video Here

Who is Eligible to Nominate a Champion?

Only communities that are a designated NC Main Street community are eligible to nominate a Champion.
DAC and Small-Town Main Street communities may nominate once they move up to NC Main Street.

Why Nominate?

Designating an NC Main Street Champion is a wonderful way to show your organization’s appreciation for the efforts of a deserving person (or persons) who has/have gone the extra mile in working to make your downtown successful. A secondary benefit of designating a Champion is the opportunity it provides for generating goodwill and positive PR for your downtown program.

Nomination Categories

NC Main Street Champions MUST BE PEOPLE, who have made a SIGNIFICANT impact in a downtown or a downtown program, ideally over the last year and who went above and beyond their volunteer or job responsibilities. Once an NC Main Street Champion, always an NC Main Street Champion! If your program has previously honored someone as an NC Main Street Champion, that individual continues to be a Champion for your community and may not be re-designated by your program. However, someone who received the designation from another community and has made significant contributions to your downtown’s revitalization efforts may also be named a Champion by your town.

​Champion Designation May Fall Under The Following Categories:

  • An individual - (John Smith)
  • A couple - (John and Lucy Smith)
  • A civic organization board of directors - (Board of Directors, Smallville Arts Council)
  • Owners of a downtown business - (John Smith)
  • Owners of a property - (John Smith)
  • Governmental council - (Board of Commissioners, Town of Smallville)
  • Departmental staff (Public Works Staff, Town of Smallville)

Champion nominations ARE NOT:

  • A municipal entity - (Town of Smallville)
  • A business - (Nil’s Cafe)
  • Staff of a business - (Nil's Cafe and Staff)

 

 

Instructions and Nomination Template:

Online Submission Portal:

About the Design Program

Since March of 2016, the North Carolina Main Street Program has partnered with UNCG’s Interior Architecture Department and its Center for Community-Engaged Design to provide design assistance to designated Main Street and Small Town Main Street communities across the state. Undergraduate and graduate students are selected to become Main Street Fellows.  The Main Street Fellows work with UNCG Interior Architecture Department Professors to complete facade rehabilitation designs and upper story apartment conversions in designated Main Street communities.

Design Request

  • This service is a benefit to our designated NC Main Street & Small Town Main Street communities only
  • Downtown Associate Communities cannot use this service until they move up to NC Main Street designation
  • Speculative projects are not accepted
  • Submit projects where the property owner(s) is highly motivated to implement the design
  • Work closely with your property/business owner(s) to complete the form

Forms

Funding Opportunities

The NC Main Street and Rural Planning Center maintains a "Comprehensive Grant Funding and Resource Guide" that may assist you in securing additional funding. Please click HERE to go to the "Funding Opportunities" section on this page or scroll to the top of the page. 
 
Once on the page, look for the NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center section.  That is where the funding guide is located and is updated on a consistent basis.

About the Process

The NC Main Street & Rural Planning Center offers 5-year strategic economic development and implementation plan services to designated Main Street and rural communities throughout the state.  Based on the unique assets of each project area, the Center’s staff will facilitate a process with community leaders that identifies and assesses strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and challenges, market data, economic development strategies and a set of actions for implementation that will bring the community’s vision to fruition.  A proven blueprint for success, communities throughout North Carolina have experienced public and private investment, grants and funding awards, new business development, job creation, and volunteerism as a direct result of having a strategic plan to guide their community and economic development initiatives.

Begin the Process

Contact Liz Parham 

Maps: Our Work and Resources

Facade Designs

 

NC Mapping Frequently Used Maps